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Here's your chance to reach a broad public interested in documentaries. Get the (D-)Word out!

Please include a LOCATION. Spam will be deleted.

As this is a PUBLIC forum, it is also a good idea to write email addresses longhand (person[AT]d-word[dot]com)

Matt Dubuque
Pro

Might anyone have a reasonably priced copy of The Technique of Film Editing by Karel Reisz for sale? I would prefer the first edition, but the second edition would also be acceptable.

Thanks!

Robert Goodman
Pro

Why? Are you planning on cutting workprint? If you want to learn how to edit read Walter Murch's book or mine "Editing Digital Video." My co-author and I wrote it to replace Karel's fine book which was great when we were cutting on flatbeds with workprint.

Matt Dubuque
Pro

Hi-

I'm currently studying the Technique of Film and Video Editing in its 4th printing, by Ken Dancyger. It has an excellent history on how different editing techniques are featured in different genres and how technological changes have impacted editing decisions and styles.

It's an extraordinary book and is at:

http://tinyurl.com/2f4t7z

He cites Karel's book as a deep inspiration and I need to study it. I am extremely serious and thorough about what I am doing and I can't afford to gloss over all the great cinema before video was invented.

My view is that quality editing is to a substantial extent independent of the medium. Alternatively stated, if I immerse myself in the study of the editing techniques of Hitchcock, Kurosawa, Resnais, Welles, Goddard and Fellini, I will be serving my interests well. I will never achieve my idea of greatness in cinema without mastering what each of these masters was all about.

Robert Goodman
Pro

Then you should read Eisenstein. Karel took his tiny bit of editing philosophy from him. Most of the book is about the mechanics of editing film. Another series of books worth reading are by EDWARD DMYTRYK. Called "On Screen Directing" "On Film Editing" etc.

Boyd McCollum
Pro

Another good book would be "Story" by Robert McKee. Don't forget, editing is storytelling.

Richard Burnsed
Fan

Nor-Cal Filmmakers, Show your chops!

The Sacramento International Film Festival is giving people two chances to screen work. One is the 48 Hour Film Festival where teams complete a short movie in 48 hours.
http://www.ncwfonline.org/id42.html

The second is Current Visions. In conjunction with Current TV, Filmmakers are asked to submit a 10 minute documentary for screening. The documentaries can be about on any topic including: Bio, Humanities, Politics or other. The top documentaries will also be picked up for broadcast by Current TV.
http://www.ncwfonline.org/id61.html

Matt Dubuque
Pro

Thanks Gentlemen, I appreciate it!

Yep, clearly Eisenstein is key. I'm really enjoying the war films of Humphrey Jennings; the way he combines music with a documentary (Listening to Britain) and poetry with a documentary (Words for Battle) is masterful. And although he clearly is influenced by montage, Jennings is singularly British as well.

I'm also enjoying how King Vidor weaves sound and scene in Our Daily Bread and his work generally (The Crowd).

And I remain a serious devotee of Bunuel and his editing throughout his very long career.

I'm interested in exploring new avenues in what role sound plays in a documentary and how to weave that into the editing process. Any reading suggestions you might have along these lines would also be warmly welcomed.

Thanks for all the help!

John Burgan
Host

If you're enjoying the Jennings, a must-read is Dai Vaughan's "Portrait of an Invisible Man: The Working Life of Stewart MacAllister, Film Editor". Remember that "Listen to Britain" credits Jennings and MacAllister as co-directors.

It's the single most inspiring book on editing documentary I know, written by the most experienced documentary editor in the UK. It's out of print, but you can still find copies via websites like http://www.abebooks.com

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