Introduce Yourself: Sign In Here First

Introduce Yourself

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Welcome to The D-Word! Stop in and sign the guest book - let us know a little (or a lot) about yourself.

Please note that this is one of our Public Topics, so best to enter email addresses with (at) to prevent them being harvested. Spam will be deleted.

Dustin Ogdin
Fan
Hello. I just discovered this fourm through the Docurama website.
I haven't even looked around yet! I just registered and hopped in
to introduce myself.

I'm yet another one of those "aspiring" documentary filmmakers the
digital age has bred. I'm currently researching for a doc in
Chicago (where I live) and have shot some footage that couldn't
wait for my research. Hope to find some other Chicagoans.

Glad to be here - I'm going to go dig around and see what all
you've got here. Very excited to know this forum exists.
Kenzie Soedt
Pro
Hello all-

I'm a Chicago filmmaker working on my first documentary. I'm excited
to be a part of the community, and I'm sure I'll be visiting often for
your insights. Thanks for having me!

Kenzie
Steve Holmes
Pro
Cool! Two more Midwesterners (I'm in Iowa). Welcome, Dustin and
Kenzie. You guys in IFP/Chicago? D-Worder Cheri Pugh is a Chicagoan.
David Seidman
Fan
Howdy. My name's David Seidman, and I'm a print journalist and
non-fiction author in the Los Angeles area. I want to enter the
world of documentarians, so here I am.

I've written for the Los Angeles Times, among other publications,
and I spent a few years on staff at Disney (in the publishing
division, but deeply tied to film and TV). I've written books on
everything from U.S. history to the science and medicine of
longevity to Christmas lights to careers in journalism (including
documentaries). These days, I'm a full-time freelancer.

Thanks for letting me join the group. I realize that I'm not a
filmmaker type (not yet, at least), but I'll try to fit in.

David Seidman
davidseidman@earthlink.net
Robert Goodman
Pro
Welcome David. Our humble hosts are either on holiday or working hard
these days but I'm sure one of them - Doug, Ben, or John - will make
an appearance.

Nonfiction filmmakers show up from every corner of the known and
unknown career world. Glad to have another even if those of us who
have been digging in the trenches for years sigh at all the new arrivals.

We smile at the newly addicted. ;-)
Steve Holmes
Pro
Welcome, David. You sound as if you have skills that will transfer
to filmmaking.
Leah Pate
Pro
Hello there-
I just joined the forum. I have spent the past year working on a
documentary about women working in survival sex in Vancouver, Canada.
Between 1986 and 2002 sixty-eight women virtually disappeared from a
tiny area in the dowtown eastside. However, for a variety of reasons,
a full-scale investigation was not launched until 2000.

My major problem is one of ethics. There are three major advocacy
groups that service women in the area. In order for them to
participate in the film and to assist us in anyway, they demand that
women working in the sex trade that agree to participate in the
documentary be paid an honorarium. This is my first film but it is my
understanding that documentary participants should not be paid. We
are about half way through filming and while several people have
participated in the film, the women that are actually still on the
street have been paid an honorarium thus far. Are honorariums ever
acceptable? If we want to find a market and have the film be
considered credible, can we use any of the footage that women were
given an honorarium for?

My concern is this: people will think that we exploited these very
poor and most often addicted women by offering them "easy" money to
be interviewed (without showing their faces or using their real
names). Yet without the support of the advocacy agencies, we really
would not have been able to get anything done; also because we have
met most of the women while they are working on the street, offering
an honorarium shows them that we respect that they are, in fact,
working and that their time is valuable. Any advice or insight would
be greatly appreciated!
Robert Goodman
Pro
A small honorarium will not cause concern for most. Given the
circumstances you really have no choice. Just keep it small and the
same for all.
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