Introduce Yourself: Sign In Here First

Introduce Yourself

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Welcome to The D-Word! Stop in and sign the guest book - let us know a little (or a lot) about yourself.

Please note that this is one of our Public Topics, so best to enter email addresses with (at) to prevent them being harvested. Spam will be deleted.

Victor Huey

Hi, My name is Victor Huey, I am making a documentary about the underground music scene in China, called "Rocking the Great Wall" Shot over a 25 year period form 1986-2011. We are now entering post production. Besides releasing a traditional feature length documentary,I have been thinking about new strategies such as distribution via a interactive documentary social network site based on my content.

Jon Foy

Hey Caroline. I just noticed that you joined D-Word. Cheers.

Doug Block

Welcome aboard, Victor. Noticed your post about your distribution plans in the Peter Broderick discussion. Very intriguing, hope you'll share more in the Marketing and Distribution topic.

Grace C. Albasin

In reply to Jeremy Pevar's post on Fri 4 Mar 2011 :

Hello everyone! I am Grace Albasin from the Philippines but I am here in New York City taking up my MA in Media Studies at The New School. It's great to be part of this group but I am just beginning to tread on documentary. I haven't done anything yet but it is the track I'm pursuing at school.

Doug Block

Welcome, Grace. Enjoy NYC and good luck with your studies.

Matthew McFadden

Aloha Nui,

Storytelling and music are the two things that define purpose of this thing called me. Maui was where the journey this time around began. Los Angeles, New York and New Mexico are places used to dwell. Finding others of the same drive and passion is what makes being here possible. Always looking forward to meeting others to make more magic. "Life's like a movie. Write your own ending. Keep believing. Keep pretending"

Leroy Metcalf


My name is Leroy Metcalf and I am an aspiring filmmaker. I'm currently working on my first documentary titled, "Why Do You Hate Me So Much?", which is about people interacting with other people that may hate them because of race, religion, sexual orientation, geographical location, political views, gender or age. I expect there to be a lot conflict during these interactions, but definitely not Jerry Springer type conflict. The aim is to open up dialogue with people that hate others because of there differences and to hopefully understand why people hate and to get people to think and be more accepting towards others.

I'm very new to this site and I don't know the rules yet. I would really like to network with people to get them involved in my project. Doug/John, please let me know if that's not allowed on this site.



Blaire Johnson

In reply to Linda Wasson's post on Mon 7 Mar 2011 07:55 UTC :

I completely understand your frustration and your pessimism. I think the American public at large is finally ready to hear about industrial hemp, and I think the changes in the technology, and the interest in being greener and more energy efficient are all coming together. As much as we have needed hemp for years, I think hemp's time is finally here, thanks in part to hemp's ability to build the healthiest, most energy efficient houses.

It's horrible to think of the thousands of farms and farmers who could have saved their family farms had they been able to grow hemp. And it's horrible to think of all the merchants who got behind hemp and lost so much, because the market wasn't ready for their vision.

So many people still confuse industrial hemp with marijuana. I've worked at Barnes & Noble for the past 6 years, and I have never seen industrial hemp grace the front cover of a magazine, except for the occasional mention on the front cover of one of the periodicals on marijuana, and it has been equally hard to find hemp cited in the indexes of books one might think it should be included in. I think America is going to be really excited to meet industrial hemp at this time in history, thanks in great part to the many reasons that you cited above. In May, the nation will be celebrating the 2nd annual Hemp History Week. Slowly but surely, the tides are changing.

Jacob Bricca

My name is Jacob Bricca, and I'm new to D-Word. I've been editing feature docs since the early 2000s. Some of my credits are Lost in La Mancha (2002), which chronicled Terry Gilliam's disastrous attempt to make a film adaptation of Don Quixote, Jimmy Scott: If You Only Knew (2002), a biopic/concert film about the jazz vocalist that won the 2003 Independent Lens Audience Award, Tell Me Do You Miss Me (2006), a melancholy travelogue following indie rock band Luna on their final tour dist. by Rhino, and Con Artist (2010), which follows the indescribably odd antics of NYC painter Mark Kostabi and is playing at the Laemmle Sunset 5 in LA this coming April 1-7.

Though I seem to work on a lot of films about musicians and artists, some of the ones I'm most passionate about deal with themes of social justice. We just locked picture on Precious Knowledge, a film about the banning of the Mexican-American ethnic studies classes running in the Tucson public schools, which opponents call "seditious" and proponents see as an effective way of engaging their students. (It will premiere at the San Diego Intl. Film Festival later this month.)

I've also done some directing/producing. My feature Indies Under Fire: The Battle for the American Bookstore (2006) followed three indie bookstores in their struggle to stay afloat in the early 2000s. My most recent short Pure, a mash-up of action movie memes, played at the Berlin Intl. Film Festival, and was abuzz on the web for a brief period.

I also teach documentary studies and production at Wesleyan University. Teaching "The Documentary Film" (a history/survey course) is a humbling experience--so many great films! I love exposing students to the genius of Frederick Wiseman, the Maysles Bros. and Ross McElwee, and showing contemporary docs at the close of the course (My Kid Could Paint That and Iraq In Fragments have been recent choices.) In my "Documentary Advocacy" class, I teach doc production to amateurs, and help students engage with local organizations to make films that they can use for outreach purposes.

I love docs and all the issues of they bring up. I thought the recent love-fest over The Social Network was way overblown and advised anyone I could to watch Catfish instead. I thought it engaged with the Facebook phenomenon and all its attendant issues way more successfully!

Happy to be here...

Jill Woodward

Jacob, I've had Lost in La Mancha on my list to see for some time now. I'll have to step it up. Welcome to the d-word discussions!