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Robert Goodman
Thu 7 Feb 2008Link

Then you should read Eisenstein. Karel took his tiny bit of editing philosophy from him. Most of the book is about the mechanics of editing film. Another series of books worth reading are by EDWARD DMYTRYK. Called "On Screen Directing" "On Film Editing" etc.


Boyd McCollum
Thu 7 Feb 2008Link

Another good book would be "Story" by Robert McKee. Don't forget, editing is storytelling.


Richard Burnsed
Sat 9 Feb 2008Link

Nor-Cal Filmmakers, Show your chops!

The Sacramento International Film Festival is giving people two chances to screen work. One is the 48 Hour Film Festival where teams complete a short movie in 48 hours.
http://www.ncwfonline.org/id42.html

The second is Current Visions. In conjunction with Current TV, Filmmakers are asked to submit a 10 minute documentary for screening. The documentaries can be about on any topic including: Bio, Humanities, Politics or other. The top documentaries will also be picked up for broadcast by Current TV.
http://www.ncwfonline.org/id61.html


Matt Dubuque
Sun 10 Feb 2008Link

Thanks Gentlemen, I appreciate it!

Yep, clearly Eisenstein is key. I'm really enjoying the war films of Humphrey Jennings; the way he combines music with a documentary (Listening to Britain) and poetry with a documentary (Words for Battle) is masterful. And although he clearly is influenced by montage, Jennings is singularly British as well.

I'm also enjoying how King Vidor weaves sound and scene in Our Daily Bread and his work generally (The Crowd).

And I remain a serious devotee of Bunuel and his editing throughout his very long career.

I'm interested in exploring new avenues in what role sound plays in a documentary and how to weave that into the editing process. Any reading suggestions you might have along these lines would also be warmly welcomed.

Thanks for all the help!

Edited Sun 10 Feb 2008 by Matt Dubuque

John Burgan
Sun 10 Feb 2008Link

If you're enjoying the Jennings, a must-read is Dai Vaughan's "Portrait of an Invisible Man: The Working Life of Stewart MacAllister, Film Editor". Remember that "Listen to Britain" credits Jennings and MacAllister as co-directors.

It's the single most inspiring book on editing documentary I know, written by the most experienced documentary editor in the UK. It's out of print, but you can still find copies via websites like http://www.abebooks.com

Edited Sun 10 Feb 2008 by John Burgan

Matt Dubuque
Mon 11 Feb 2008Link

Thanks John, I'm enjoying the heck out of Jennings. That fellow is masterful in so many ways and way, way ahead of his time.

That's an awesome tip about McAllister. Thanks!

Matt


Simon Fred
Wed 13 Feb 2008Link

The Streaming Festival is now accepting submissions for its 3rd edition in October 2008.

Deadline for submissions is 01 September 2008.
Accepted genres are documentary, animation, video art, flash and narrative.
No entry fee.

Send submissions through postal service, or provide a website link with a preview to the submission.

The Streaming Festival is an international artfilmfestival on the internet. Films are presented full screen on streaming servers with high image quality.
The 3rd edition will start in October, and lasts four days. The Streaming Festival is based in the Netherlands but has no geographic boundaries. Viewers can visit from any location in the world, at any given time and plug into one of the festival streams.

Online submission form : http://www.streamingfestival.com/submissions/
Website : http://www.streamingfestival.com


Anthony Giacchino
Thu 14 Feb 2008Link

Hello all . . . I'm working on a project in which I would like to use entries from an old diary I've uncovered. However, I'm having the hardest time reading a large portion of what the person wrote. Does anyone out there know of a good hand-writing expert who may help me "translate" the entries? Any help/suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks!


Adam Hyman
Fri 15 Feb 2008Link

Hi all,

Still looking for experienced fixers for PBS documentary for:

Dhaka, Bangladesh
Jo'burg, South Africa
Guatemala

Please reply directly to me if you have any recommendations or resumes.
ahyman@jtnproductions.com


Doug Block
Fri 15 Feb 2008Link

To "Anonymous Please", we've deleted your post because we have a policy at The D-Word that no one can post anonymously. We're not censors – if you identify yourself, and are willing to confirm it should we feel the need, then feel free to post it again.

Edited Fri 15 Feb 2008 by Doug Block

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