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Recommended Documentaries

This is a topic where you can say which documentary has really impressed you, and why people should see it. Can be a recent one or an all-time favourite. Can't be your own though, sorry...

We also have a Documentary Films topic for our Professionals where the debate is private and possibly more controversial. This topic here is for recommendations to the documentary-interested public.

This topic is for praising the work of others, not your own. If you want to beat the drum for your own documentary, please don't do it here. Enthusiasts use our Public Classifieds, and Professionals have their own Shameless Self-Promotion topic.

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Charlotte Lagarde
Sat 9 Apr 2011Link

In reply to Nadia Awad's post on Wed 30 Mar 2011 :
The Arbor is incredible. I saw it at MOMA, very intimate.It will open at Film Forum in NY 4/27
http://www.filmforum.org/films/arbor.html


James Longley
Sun 10 Apr 2011Link

I finally saw Inside Job this evening. Very worthy film – does a good job of laying out the financial crisis and its roots. I hope everyone sees it. However, style-wise I felt the same kind of sinking feeling I get in so many issue docs these days – a kind of Inconvenient Truth slideshow malaise, where all cinematic feeling is lost. Honestly, though, I am at a loss to imagine how else he might have made this particular doc-as-indictment film, so I probably shouldn't complain too loudly. It's another one of those movies I hope other people watch, even though I feel it continues the trend of documentary-as-lecture that has been degrading the genre from the point of view of cinematic experience over the last decade or so. It was a film you could have playing in the living room while you make dinner in the kitchen without missing much.

Edited Sun 10 Apr 2011 by James Longley

Alessandro Gallo
Mon 11 Apr 2011Link

In reply to Ellen Brodsky's post on Sun 3 Apr 2011 :
Happy to hear this, i am pretty sure you gonna love this film.


James Longley
Mon 11 Apr 2011Link

In reply to James Longley's post on Sun 10 Apr 2011 :

By contrast, Armadillo was great. A very strong work of documentary cinema about foreign troops in Afghanistan, at last. I hope it gets a wide release.


Alessandro Gallo
Mon 11 Apr 2011Link

In reply to James Longley's post on Mon 11 Apr 2011 :
I absolutely agree with you, i saw it and i was quite impressed.


Doug Block
Mon 11 Apr 2011Link

I've rsvp'd for a preview screening of Armadillo this Wed night. Very eager to see it.


John Burgan
Mon 18 Apr 2011Link

Death by plastic? This powerful short film was recently produced and shot by D-Worder Riley Morton.

Edited Mon 18 Apr 2011 by John Burgan

Sahand Sahebdivani
Tue 19 Apr 2011Link

Thanks for making that Riley. Thanks for sharing it, John.


Barbara Rick
Tue 19 Apr 2011Link

Thoroughly enamored by the Bill Cunningham New York film. Best doc I have seen in a very long time.


Doug Block
Wed 20 Apr 2011Link

Been eager to see it. Where is it playing? I missed it at the Film Forum.


Barbara Rick
Wed 20 Apr 2011Link

It's now at IFC and City Cinemas East Village.. and a couple of other places. Really worth seeing in my book.


Christopher Wong
Thu 21 Apr 2011Link

In reply to James Longley's post on Sun 10 Apr 2011 :

i just watched INSIDE JOB, and i must say... yawwwwwnnnnn! i was really looking forward to it, but it was just so uncinematic and uninspiring. i suppose if one had their head in the sand for the past few years – or stuck in Pakistan/Iran – and had no knowledge of the financial crisis already, then it could have been educational. but having listened to This American Life's radio series on the crisis, and having read a whole bunch of newspaper articles on the same, it just did not add anything new.

i really think it is regrettable that an unimaginative doc like INSIDE JOB gets nominated for an oscar, but films like LAST TRAIN HOME and THE OATH get left behind.


James Longley
Thu 21 Apr 2011Link

Heh. You know, even when in Pakistan I still listen to TAL and Planet Money podcasts every week. I also went through several books on the subject, including the highly recommended The Big Short as well as The Black Swan and 13 Bankers and also The Quants just for fun. But still, even though I thought Inside Job was cinematically standard and even dullish, it was still a film I'm happy got made – and I know people who only really got their heads around the financial crisis after watching it. Not everybody is a public radio policy wonk. That said, I also wish that The Oath had been nominated.


Danielle Beverly
Thu 21 Apr 2011Link

The Oath is brilliant. Laura Poitras is fearless. So bummed she was not nominated.


John Burgan
Thu 21 Apr 2011Link

Here is what will probably be Tim Hertherington's last film (he just died while shooting a project in Libya). Harrowing and poignant.

Edited Sat 23 Apr 2011 by John Burgan

John Burgan
Sun 24 Apr 2011Link

Docalliance has a wide range of docs online (legally, unlike many portals), some to download at small cost or even free, others streamed:

From April 18 to May 2, you can watch five unique, multiply awarded documentary films by Polish director Marcel Łoziński for free. Enjoy the best of the past twenty years of a filmmaker who is “trying to influence the reality around him while following the outcome with openness”.


Christian Polli
Fri 6 May 2011Link

I don't know if any of you have seen Catfish, but it was really interesting. I watched it the other day and found it to be mildly creepy and I certainly did not expect the ending.


Jason Perdue
Fri 6 May 2011Link

I saw several great docs at SF Int'l this year, but the one I was moved enough to come here to post about it was BUCK, Audience winner at Sundance. I think it's getting a release soon. Don't miss it.


Marth Christensen
Sat 7 May 2011Link

SIFF is showing Buck June 8 (SIFF Cinema) and June 9 (Kirkland).


Jennifer Gli
Sun 8 May 2011Link

In reply to John Burgan's post on Sun 17 Apr 2011 :

Heart-breaking, but great work. Any plans to do a feature length doc on this subject?


John Burgan
Tue 10 May 2011Link

Academy-Award nominated filmmaker (and long time member of The D-Word) James Longley (IRAQ IN FRAGMENTS) has made his 2002 documentary GAZA STRIP available for free online in its entirety:

Edited Tue 10 May 2011 by John Burgan

Kurt Engfehr
Tue 17 May 2011Link

great little film about the Salton Sea and the strange community that used to surround it and what's left of it.


Jason Osder
Tue 17 May 2011Link

Working on a crash course with a motivated student, I noticed how many great docs are on Netflix streaming these days. Thought I'd share a sample here:

Harlan County USA
Last Train Home
Man on Wire
When We Were Kings
It Might Get Loud
The Oath
Marwencol


John Frisbie
Wed 25 May 2011Link

In reply to James Longley's post on Sun 10 Apr 2011 : I agree. It muckracks to the point that it glosses over some of the real story. but, too, i wonder how else it might have been done.


John Frisbie
Wed 25 May 2011Link

I tend to get on a high after seeing a great movie – but Last Train Home was a masterpiece.


Fiona Otway
Wed 25 May 2011Link

In reply to Kurt Engfehr's post on Tue 17 May 2011 :

Some gorgeous footage in there... I've seen several docs popping up about the Salton Sea lately... Here's one I'm eager to check out:


Marth Christensen
Thu 2 Jun 2011Link

Just finished "Genghis Blues", re: Paul Pena and Tuvan throatsinging (netflix). It is great! I swear I put it on my queue because of something I recently read here, but can't find the posting. I read Fyneman's "Tuva or Bust!" years ago. I'm sure I have the companion record somewhere around the house.


Marj Safinia
Thu 2 Jun 2011Link

It's one of my favs!


Jason Osder
Thu 2 Jun 2011Link

Yes!


Barbara Rick
Sat 11 Jun 2011Link

Thoroughly enjoyed Page One. Caught it recently at a special screening at a brunch event for Film Forum supporters. David Carr and Brian Stelter are brilliant. As a lifelong journalist, it thrilled me. Two of my favorite docs this year take place behind-the-scenes at The Times– this one and Bill Cunningham NY.


Danielle Beverly
Sat 11 Jun 2011Link

Barbara, the trailer reads like a fiction. The soundbites are phenomenal.


Barbara Rick
Sun 12 Jun 2011Link

Loved it, Danielle.


Kurt Engfehr
Tue 14 Jun 2011Link

here's a newfangled 'interactive documentary' supported by our good friends from the north, the NFB. it's a look at a small town in Canada that was closed! http://pinepoint.nfb.ca/#/pinepoint

it's part photo album, documentary and oral history. real interesting stuff.


Marth Christensen
Tue 14 Jun 2011Link

That is FASCINATING! Thanks.


Scheffee Wilson
Tue 14 Jun 2011Link

1. Capitalism: A Love Story
2.


Kate Imbach
Thu 16 Jun 2011Link

In reply to Kurt Engfehr's post on Tue 14 Jun 2011 :

how interesting! thanks for the rec!


Reid B. Kimball
Sat 18 Jun 2011Link

Hi everyone,

Not sure if I should ask here or somewhere else. I'm wondering if anyone knows of a "first person" documentary film? Meaning, the film is about a person but it is filmed from their perspective. For example, I'm the director, the film is about my story and I film everything from my view.

Edited Sat 18 Jun 2011 by Reid B. Kimball

Ramona Diaz
Sat 18 Jun 2011Link

There's a whole slew but a seminal work in this genre is Ross McElwee's Sherman's March.


Eliaichi Kimaro
Sun 19 Jun 2011Link

In reply to Reid B. Kimball's post on Sat 18 Jun 2011 :
Hi Reid, I know this isn't the place for self-promo, but in answer to your question, my film A Lot Like You is a first person doc...


Reid B. Kimball
Sun 19 Jun 2011Link

Yay! Thank you Ramona and Eliaichi, I will check both of these out today.


Ben Kempas
Sun 19 Jun 2011Link

Well, most of the films directed by D-Word founder Doug Block are first-person docs...


Jo-Anne Velin
Mon 20 Jun 2011Link

In reply to Reid B. Kimball's post on Sun 19 Jun 2011 :

Tarnation.


Nick Verbitsky
Wed 6 Jul 2011Link

My pick would be AMERICAN HARDCORE.

As a lifelong music freak (and former employee of WNEW-FM NYC, the world's GREATEST rock station ever) it moved me in ways no other film has. I always thought punk rock was noise, but this film really got me into the artistry of it, the characters involved, and after I watched it, I bought more songs on iTunes than I had in a long time by bands I never knew much about-Bad Brains, Dead Boys, Minor Threat, etc.

Most touching of all was the story of how Johnny Ramone stole Joey's girlfriend and married her-it was a scar the shy/sociall awkward Joey carried with him until he died-really showed that these artists are dimensional and above all, very human. I couldn't recommend this film more highly.....


John Gyovai
Tue 12 Jul 2011Link

Got to give it up to just a few of my favorite films with the word "Devil" in the title: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qtFPOxDMs4


John Gyovai
Tue 12 Jul 2011Link

Part II: The Devil's Miner
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqk-Scp6Lw8


Pliers Sanderson
Wed 20 Jul 2011Link

I have just watched Danfung Dennis's 'Hell and BAck Again' – WOW! It raises the bar for camera and editing. In the recent glut of war docs this one really holds its own.


Sam Gaty
Thu 21 Jul 2011Link

I'll re-rec IRAQ IN FRAGMENTS and add a few others to the list:

THE GLEANERS AND I (Anges Varda)
F IS FOR FAKE (Orson Wells)
MONDO VINO (Jonathan Nossiter)
GASLAND (Josh Fox)
THE UP SERIES (Michael Apted)


kesang choki
Wed 31 Aug 2011Link

Hi Reid! i would recommend, "The Gleaners and I" and the "Queen and I"In reply to Reid B. Kimball's post on Sat 18 Jun 2011 :


John Burgan
Wed 31 Aug 2011Link

Alternative list compiled by London doc producer John Wyver to the current Morgan Spurlock/Current TV series: 50 (more) docs before you die


Michael B. McGee
Wed 14 Sep 2011Link

In reply to Scheffee Wilson's post on Tue 14 Jun 2011 :

+1 on Capitalsim: A Love Story

unbelievably heartbreaking.


Ben Kempas
Sun 18 Sep 2011Link

D-Worders may remember that we did a special topic two years ago on the controversy surrounding the release of Fredrik Gertten's film, BANANAS!*.

For those of you who (like me) didn't have a chance to see the film on the festival circuit, you can now watch it on Distrify – and finally make up your own minds.

Highly recommended!


Jo-Anne Velin
Mon 19 Sep 2011Link

Congratulations to distrify for having Bananas on the platform (which is looking terrific, by the way – I always loved the triangles as their logo)!


Ben Kempas
Mon 19 Sep 2011Link

It's more of a matter of Dogwoof partnering with Distrify for their entire online distribution. Fredrik didn't even know BANANAS!* was up there. :-)

I#m just wondering if the above rental works anywhere or whether it's been geo-blocked for UK availability only?


Eli Brown
Mon 19 Sep 2011Link

I clicked on the rent and it put a "sign up for email notification for when it's available in your area" notice. So, I think it is geo-blocking...


Pablo Alvarez-Mesa
Wed 21 Sep 2011Link

Yeah, I did too and that sign-up notice appeared and that made me not want to continue. I sort of tune off sites that ask for my emails for basic access.. was that just because of geo-blocking? or do users have to register to watch a film?


Ben Kempas
Wed 21 Sep 2011Link

Eli – At the moment, it's even doing that here in the UK although Dogwoof is a UK distributor. I've emailed Peter to find out.

Pablo – What do you mean, "for basic access"? You need to register in order to make a purchase (VoD or DVD) or to access your previous VoD purchase. You don't need to register to watch the trailer.


Ben Kempas
Wed 21 Sep 2011Link

Update: the bug is fixed, but the film may still not be available in all territories. (You might have to empty your cache before you try again.)


Pablo Alvarez-Mesa
Thu 22 Sep 2011Link

In reply to Ben Kempas's post on Wed 21 Sep 2011 :

Fair enough.. I guess I just sort of expected to be directed to a page with a slot for a credit card number and then to the film in two simple steps. Its a great service, don't get me wrong... Thing is i just unconsciously seem to close pages that ask for email addresses up front..


John Burgan
Fri 9 Dec 2011Link

Glass is a 1958 Dutch short documentary film by director and producer Bert Haanstra. The film won the Academy Award for Documentary Short Subject in 1959. (thanks to my former student Anna in Barcelona for sending this)

Edited Fri 9 Dec 2011 by John Burgan

James Longley
Sat 10 Dec 2011Link

It's great – where did I see this before?
Only I can't stand the sound of jazz vibraphone in film soundtracks. But the editing is pretty terrific.

Edited Sat 10 Dec 2011 by James Longley

John Burgan
Sat 10 Dec 2011Link

Then check out Broadway by Light by William Klein, 1958 – prepare to be blown away)

Edited Sat 10 Dec 2011 by John Burgan

John Burgan
Sat 10 Dec 2011Link

Here's the final one of the three this evening: Portrait of Ga by Margaret Tait (1955) – also a gift from Anna

Edited Sat 10 Dec 2011 by John Burgan

David Herman
Sat 10 Dec 2011Link

lovely indeed.


David Herman
Tue 13 Dec 2011Link

Whoever has not seen 5 broken cameras DO IT (if for no other reason than to question your humanity)


James Longley
Wed 14 Dec 2011Link

That always packs 'em in. People love to question their humanity.
That's an amazing film, though, all joking aside. See it if you can.


James McNally
Thu 22 Dec 2011Link

Forgive me if this has been posted elsewhere (I tried searching) but Jane Weiner is trying to raise funds for her film Ricky On Leacock over on Kickstarter and the deadline is January 1st. The film is only around 30% funded so far and it's an incredibly important project about a towering figure in documentary filmmaking. Please check it out and, if you can, support it with a pledge: http://kck.st/sSwdQs


Doug Block
Thu 22 Dec 2011Link

I second your recommendation, James. Jane's an old friend of mine and we've worked together on 3 films as producers (including my own Home Page). But separating that out, it's a project well worth supporting. Leacock is, indeed, a towering figure in doc history.


Jacob Bricca
Tue 7 Feb 2012Link

In reply to Marj Safinia's post on Thu 17 Mar 2011 :

I'm honored to see La Mancha (which I edited) in such esteemed company. It was a tough edit. At times it seemed like our film, too, would suffer the fate of Gilliam's!


Jacob Bricca
Tue 7 Feb 2012Link

In reply to John Burgan's post on Sat 10 Dec 2011 :

Thanks so much for putting up this link to "Glass." I've looked for it online before and never found it.


Jacob Bricca
Tue 7 Feb 2012Link

A recent one that really impressed me was "Better This World", which was on POV last season. Wow. An amazing story, and inspired use of archival and reenactments.


Nick Verbitsky
Tue 7 Feb 2012Link

Just saw SENNA....was very impressed w the storytelling, more so w the fact that no orig footage was shot for it....


Rhonda Moskowitz
Sat 3 Mar 2012Link

One of my favorite docs is "Lake of Fire," directed by Tony Kaye. I'm reminded of it, because of his recent narrative feature, "Detachment," which will soon have a theatrical release.

http://www.tonykaye.com/index.php/films/detail/lake_of_fire_trailer/


Constance Ryder
Sun 18 Mar 2012Link

i will never forget "The land of wandering souls" by Cambodian Rithy Panh


John Burgan
Mon 30 Apr 2012Link

A historical curiosity rather than a great work, but fascinating nonetheless: painter Edvard Munch's home movies, shot in Spring 1927 on a Pathé-Baby with a 9,5 mm. film cassette


John Burgan
Thu 3 May 2012Link

Munch's "The Scream" just sold for $120m at auction

A wealth of fascinating archive has recently been put online by The British Council

Edited Thu 3 May 2012 by John Burgan

Raymund Gerard C. Cruz
Tue 8 May 2012Link

This is not as self promotion, but for "friendship" promotions.

My good friend and former co-producer, Waise Azimi, made this interesting documentary a few years back. It's called STANDING UP and its about an Afghan military unit as they go through recruitment. (I don't want to give too much away).

It's been around in the festival circuit and finally got picked up by a distribution company.

If you want to see another perspective on war, catch STANDING UP!

Here is the official website: http://www.standingupthemovie.com/index.htm

You can purchase the DVD on Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/Standing-Up-Taking-Over-The/dp/B0064EGS66


Florian Aurel Augustin
Tue 8 May 2012Link Tag

According to several Indonesian environmental NGOs (REDD-Monitor and
WatchIndonesia) “Cari Hutan" might be the most informative, educative,
yet thrilling and amusing documentary ever made in Indonesia about the
subject of deforestation. “Cari Hutan” is, above all, a road movie
that takes the audience on an adventurous journey, by hitchhiking and boat, through
Kalimantan in search of the last remaining forests. The filmmaker looks into the issue of deforestation, its causes, its effects on the country and what we can do to improve the situation. Eventually it
follows the traces of destruction to Jakarta and Germany. Not only
locals, the inhabitants of the forests, farmers and loggers are being
interviewed, but also prominent journalists, scientist and most
importantly Prof. Bungaran Saragih, former Minister of Agriculture and
Forestry of Indonesia, who is responsible for a large part of the
destruction.


Pliers Sanderson
Mon 21 May 2012Link

I recently saw Gypsy Blood on TV in the UK and was incredibly happy to see this style of doc (no voice over and space between the scenes) on main stream TV with a prime-time slot of 10pm. The trailer makes it look like a doc on bare knuckle fighting. But this, i believe, was just a way to sell it to the masses as in fact it goes much deeper than that, in to a community and their values, as well as the relationship between father and sons. A first ever film, shot by photographer Leo Maguire on a Canon 5D it looks beautiful and i hope gets some festival showings as it deserves to be seen on a large screen.
The embed video would not take this URL for some reason –
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldDwfNLD5F8


John Burgan
Wed 15 Aug 2012Link

Tribute to an almost entirely forgotten documentary filmmaker: Robert Vas came to London as a refugee from Hungary in 1956, to make over thirty films in the next twenty years, most of them for the BBC. This tribute made shortly after his death in 1978 is presented by fellow exile Karel Reisz (note that the film starts very quietly)

Full disclosure: a decade ago, I tried to make a film portrait of Vas with producer John Wyver, but we couldn't get anywhere with the BBC (a certain commissioning editor's explanation being "we're interested in the future not the past"); in the meantime, many of those who knew him have passed on themselves. Check out this entry on Vas, Robert who? on the excellent blog John maintains for his company Illuminations.

Edited Wed 15 Aug 2012 by John Burgan

Fiona Otway
Mon 3 Sep 2012Link

Just saw THE ACT OF KILLING at the Telluride Film Festival (its world premiere, I believe). I had to pick up my jaw off the floor after they turned on the lights at the end of the show. This has been one of the most talked about films of the festival and I can't wait to hear the broader doc community react to this one.....


Margot Roth
Mon 3 Sep 2012Link

Wow. That looks astonishing.


Danielle Beverly
Mon 3 Sep 2012Link

Fiona, what was your personal reaction, thoughts?


Doug Block
Mon 3 Sep 2012Link

Already heard amazing things about The Act of Killing. What else did you see there that you liked, Fiona?

Show hidden content

Daniel McGuire
Sun 9 Sep 2012Link

In reply to Fiona Otway's post on Mon 3 Sep 2012 :

That's amazing. The only other doc treatment of the 65' massacres is in a multi-part Australian doc "Riding the Tiger", which used some B/W footage from the time. (BBC I think). My doc on the Indonesian Student movement of 98 used some BBC footage and interviewed some of the survivors and witnesses. I have a good friend in Indonesia, Lexy Rambedeta, who has also worked on this issue.


John Burgan
Mon 10 Sep 2012Link

Watch Sean McAllister's films for free at Doc Alliance between Sept 10-16

Sean McAllister is a British documentary filmmaker who has brought stories from Israel, Iraq, Japan, and most recently Syria and Yemen. Sean's films portray people with characteristic intimacy and frankness, specifically in the film Japan: A Story of Love and Hate.

Watch the retrospective of a filmmaker who Michael Moore marks as "one of the most brave and powerful filmmakers around" for FREE from September 10 to 16


Pablo Alvarez-Mesa
Tue 11 Sep 2012Link

In reply to Fiona Otway's post on Mon 3 Sep 2012 :

A friend of mine just saw it at TIFF and was one of his favourite films. The other very intriguing doc at TIFF is Leviathan by Lucien Castaing-Taylor (Sweetgrass) and Véréna Paravel.. can't wait to watch those films.


Fiona Otway
Tue 11 Sep 2012Link

In reply to Danielle Beverly's post on Tue 4 Sep 2012 :

I thought THE ACT OF KILLING was fascinating for its attentive form/content relationships, which raise lots of juicy questions about the representation of history (personal/social/political), propaganda, memory, truth, witnessing, power, violence, forgiveness, performance, transformation.... Some people in the audience were very suspicious of having been emotionally manipulated by the filmmaker, others had moral qualms with the premise of the film as well as the filmmaker giving voice to warlords (similar to critiques of REDEMPTION OF GENERAL BUTTNAKED, I think), and some were concerned about sensationalizing genocide. Personally, I think this is one of those films that leaves you with way more questions than answers – questions that you have to really ponder for a while and hopefully talk to others about too – and I loved it for that reason. There are so many layers for discussion in this film.... I really enjoyed hearing the director, Joshua Oppenheimer, speak about the film too – a very thoughtful guy.


Fiona Otway
Tue 11 Sep 2012Link

In reply to Doug Block's post on Tue 4 Sep 2012 :

None of the other films I saw really affected me as strongly as THE ACT OF KILLING. But I also ended up seeing more fiction than documentary at this festival.

THE GATEKEEPERS was another very popular doc at the festival. It has some incredible historical significance, however in terms of form, it's a fairly conventional talking heads documentary. The motion graphics were very impressive immersive 3D recreations of archival photographs.

WADJDA was very charming. A simple story about a spunky Saudi Arabian girl who wants a bicycle. Well told and satisfying. First-ever film by a Saudi Arabian woman, they said.

GINGER AND ROSA was pretty and sweet. Made me want to see more of the director, Sally Potter's work. That said, I met a few people at the festival who walked out of this screening because they were bored and disappointed.

NO was a little too long, but interesting. Also deliberately plays with the relationship between form and content. I'm still thinking about it.

AMOUR won the Palme d'Or at Cannes this year. Most everyone I talked to loved this film, but I saw a short documentary on the same subject at Full Frame earlier this year, and I was way more moved by that.

Wish I could have seen STORIES WE TELL, WHAT IS THIS FILM CALLED LOVE, and PARADISE LOVE. I've been hearing great things.

Pablo, I'm also very eager to see LEVIATHAN!


Doug Block
Tue 11 Sep 2012Link

I'm really eager to see STORIES WE TELL. More than anything.


Chuck Fadely
Mon 17 Sep 2012Link

I saw SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN last night in a regular commercial Regal movie theater with a Sony 4k projector. Wow, how nice to see a good doc on a great screen with great audio. So glad to see docs getting some decent venues lately.

Did a search here looking for more info on the Sundance audience winner and haven't seen anyone mention it, so thought I'd recommend it.

SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN, by Swedish director Malik Bendjelloul, is a quest story. Some South African fans of 1970's Detroit musician 'Rodriguez', (bigger than Elvis and the Beatles in SA but in total obscurity in the US,) try to find out what happened to the "better than Dylan" voice that fueled revolt against apartheid. Well-told story that holds your attention and it has great music. Good production values. Not challenging, so ranks high in entertainment value.

Interesting to see how they put the story together with a slow reveal yet managed to keep it engaging. Great use of animation in some scenes.

The official trailer on YouTube is ad-ridden, so here's one with subtitles (movie is in English.)


Riley Morton
Mon 17 Sep 2012Link

that got good reviews here in Seattle – yet i didn't see it. sounds like you liked it pretty well, but wouldn't necessarily give it an "A"?


Jason Osder
Mon 17 Sep 2012Link

I think I wrote about this in the bar or the member's doc section.

I would give it an A. It is very well made and unexpected. I don't want to give away anything, so see it, then we can discuss.


Katina Dunn
Mon 17 Sep 2012Link

"Searching For Sugarman" is a wonderful story. Sixto Rodriguez is almost like a bodhisattva – ok I won't give anything away.

I did wonder if the people who produced his earlier records really understood him. They put all this lush, syrupy instrumental sound under his very strong guitar & voice. I wonder if that is why the albums tanked in the U.S. His lyrics are still relevant.


Chuck Fadely
Mon 17 Sep 2012Link

In reply to Riley Morton's post on Mon 17 Sep 2012 :

Oh, I LOVED Searching for Sugarman. Great film. Definitely an A. When I said "not challenging," I meant that it doesn't beat you over the head with academic or intellectual highbrow-ness. Like most great stories, it's simple and lovely.


Chris Caliman
Tue 18 Sep 2012Link

hi, im new here and a freelance filmmaker and cinematographer from germany...
nice community here and so i decidet to show you my documentaryteaser i done... i think the hole film is very interesting and some times probably controversal...

"Tarna" is a 40min. documentary film about "Lady Tarna", a extrem/scat domina from Berlin. I followed her one day with the camera, to show the everydays life of a domina, but also to show the person behind.

i shot the hole film alone in one day... this was the concept, beeing only one day with tarna and triying to make it as real as possibly...

hope you like the small teaser...

greets

Edited Tue 18 Sep 2012 by John Burgan

John Burgan
Tue 18 Sep 2012Link

Chris, welcome to The D-Word, but please read the text at the top of this Page which makes it absolutely clear that posting your own work is not what this Topic is for.

As such, the link to your video has been removed. You are welcome to repost as suggested. Thanks.


Chris Caliman
Tue 18 Sep 2012Link

hi john and sorry for this, i read it now on the top of this topic... sorry and greets


Marth Christensen
Tue 18 Sep 2012Link

Just saw this short, Caine's Arcade, about a 9 year old boy who built a cardboad arcade in his dad's used car parts shop in Los Angeles. It is an amazing story, where a filmmaker was Caine's first customer and he was so impressed, he created a flash mob set of customers last October. The whole thing has really exploded, including a Cardboard Challenge for kids around the world, coming up on 6 October.


Riley Morton
Fri 21 Sep 2012Link

In reply to Marth Christensen's post on Tue 18 Sep 2012 :

isn't that piece just fantastic? didn't know about the 'cardboard challenge.' thats very cool.


Jake Smith
Tue 2 Oct 2012Link
[link removed by host]
Lovely to see a film about India in such a lighthearted way.

Please check it out x

Edited Tue 2 Oct 2012 by John Burgan

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