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The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

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Steve Mennie
Fri 21 Feb 2003Link
Doug..

Thanks for taking the time with this..I have roughly priced
out 'higher' end stuff and would be around 15 thousand bucks
including 3 chip camera..would be a considerable stretch to go for
that and was wondering about staying with the higher end editing
capabality and going with a single chip camera to sort of feel my way
around and in the process develop some small projects that could be
used to raise money..grants etc..That would cut 5 grand off the top
and make it much more doable..

At the same time I'm concerned that the single chip would
compromise 'quality' and perhaps render these small projects useless
for such purposes. I guess I'm wondering if it's possible to get
one's feet wet cheaper and be able to produce something that could be
used to generate interest (income) that would then translate into the
possibility of upgrading to a 3 chip camera?

thanks,

Steve

Doug Block
Fri 21 Feb 2003Link
Steve, you can get a top of the line Final Cut Pro edit system, G-4
dual processor, all the memory and hard drive space you'll need for a
feature length doc, two monitors, etc. for under $7,000. You can buy
a state-of-the-art 3-chip digital camcorder like the Sony VX2000 or
PD-150 or the new Panasonic 24P camera for around $3,000. You can get
everything you need for under $10,000 if you shop around.

Margot Roth
Fri 21 Feb 2003Link
Steve, where do you live? Perhaps you want to rent a camera for a
weekend and use your local public video/film coop to edit... you can
prob. take an editing class at your local access station or something?

Then decide where you want to spend your money... nothing wrong w/ a
one-chip camera. Just depends what you wanna do w/ your stuff...

Steve Mennie
Fri 21 Feb 2003Link
You're right on the money, Doug..You're talking American dollars I
presume inwhich case 10k US translates to about 15k Cdn. As i am just
getting into this, Margot, I'm quite sure where the hell I'll be
going with it. I'm certainly committed to doing this and I want to
produce 'quality' projects so am wanting to get good stuff to work
with.

One problem for me is that I live in the interior of British
Columbia, Canada and have little access to professional help although
I do know a couple of people involved with the medium and one of whom
is quite professional having moved to this location from Toronto..

The local cable station has moved all of its video equipment to the
local high school to be used in a audio-visual class..I've checked
out the program at the school and although the teacher involved is
fairly clueless as to how to use the editing software (they hava a
new system with Adobe Premier 6.5, there are a couple of students who
do seem to know their way around on the system and have agreed to
give me some free tutorials. I'm hoping i can work my way into
getting access to the system and spend some time there perhaps
cutting up some old home movies to get a feel for the editing.
I suppose in a general sense, I'm interested in community and in
focusing on the 'particular' as apposed to the 'corporate'..in paying
attention to what is lost in communities when international
franchises move in and give communities the 'same as everywhere else'
look and feel.

I note that you mention getting Final Cut and a G4, Doug. I know that
deciding wether or not to get a Mac or a clone pc is probably more
difficult than finding a proof for God..but what is your take on the
pros or cons of going with one or the other?

thanks again for your time,

Steve

Doug Block
Sat 22 Feb 2003Link
I'm not the best to ask, Steve. All I know is me and the rest of the
world use FCP. You want a clone pc? Be my guest but lotsa luck with
support.

Ben Kempas
Sat 22 Feb 2003Link
Ehm.... the rest of the world uses FCP? Wait for this:

http://www.avid.com/company/releases/2003/030107_AvidFreeDV_prod.html

Erica Ginsberg
Sat 22 Feb 2003Link
Steve, you should see if there is some way (even a journey to
Vancouver or freebie downloads) to test out both Final Cut and Avid.
From my limited experience (I am not an editor), Final Cut has an
easier interface as an editing program if you have little editing
experience (and especially if you are interested in doing lots of
artsy overlay type effects), but, as a committed PC person who has
never found Macs more user-friendly, I knew that I had to get a
program that worked effectively on a PC so I invested in Avid XPress
DV. The main problem I've found with the Avid is that the
instruction manuals seem to presume the folks using it are
experienced with Avids and are simply new to having one at home. The
Final Cut instruction manuals I've seen don't presume you have any
editing experience.

Margot Roth
Sat 22 Feb 2003Link
STeve, maybe you could borrow someone's Mac and test out iMovie??
I've never used it but it comes free on Mac and whittles down editing
to the essentials.

For someone just getting into video, a 1-chip camera and iMovie (or
that new free Avid software Ben mentioned) would let your experiment
and have a lot of fun...

then after you've started up the learning curve, you'll have a better
idea of where to invest your money... fancier edit system, or fancier
camera (or both). Your 1-chip camera will always be handy to have...
you can use it to load footage instead of a deck later, e.g.

Also, for someone who is an artist/printmaker, I imagine the smaller
the camera the better... you can get more artistic and experiment
more... carry it w/ you everywhere... there's something about a more
expensive camera that might make you afraid to throw snow at it or
whatever...

Erica- there are so many "unofficial" editing manuals out there (for
FCP at least).. The bookstores here have whole sections of 'em. Did
you ever find an Avid manual to help you?

p.s. Steve, if you're wanting to do interviews, you will have to
invest in a microphone as well, eventually.

Steve Mennie
Sat 22 Feb 2003Link
Thanks everyone for your time and info.. Margo,Is it possible to
combine footage shot with a one chip and a 3 chip..would the cheaper
camera be useful in that way in the future? After what you were
saying about the portability etc of the smaller camera, I'm thinkin'
yah..that could be good.

I know i have to get a microphone but I was leaving that for now
while I fretted about the system and camera etc. Is there a
particular microphone that one should get/avoid??

Man, this is so great to be able to get information like this..altho
if this list wasn't available I would probably have been overwhelmed
with the difficulty etc and gone quietly back to the brushes thus
saving myself much travail..not to mention money..

Does anyone have an opinion about the Pinnacle products? The fellow
I'm talking to about a computer is yakking up the Pinnacle capture
card and Adobe Premiere 6.5..

Once again, thanks for info and time

Steve

Margot Roth
Sat 22 Feb 2003Link
real quick, am running out door...

-You really want a Mac, not a PC clone, for what you wanna do.
Believe me.

-You don't need a capture card--if you get a Mac, you just plug the
DV camera into the computer (via Firewire) and you can load footage...
It's very simple. You don't need to know about Pinnacle cards, etc.

-Any level of new Macintosh computer (including laptops) and a cheap
DV camera (one-chip) will let you get started w/ what you wanna do.

-yes, you can combine 1-chip and 3-chip footage, no problem.

In terms of Final Cut Pro... you should look at a newer product
called Final Cut Express instead... it's way cheaper than FCP, and
omits all the crap you won't need anyway.

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